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Image Credit: Painted/brushed heart symbol – abstract love, by photosteve101, via Flickr Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC by 2.0) license

February 8-13, 2016, is Love Your Data (LYD) week. According to the LYD week blog, the event, coordinated by research data specialists, mostly working in academic and research libraries, “is designed to raise awareness about research data management, sharing, and preservation along with the support and resources available at your college or university.” Each day of the week will focus on a different theme. The themes are:

Monday, Feb. 8 – Keep Your Data Safe

Tuesday, Feb. 9 – It’s the 21st Century – Do You Know Where Your data Is? (organizing data)

Wednesday, Feb. 10 – Help Your Future Self – Write It Down! (document, document, document)

Thursday, Feb. 11 – Respect Your Data – Give and Get Credit

Friday, Feb. 12 – Think Big – Transforming, Extending, Reusing Data

Being a social media campaign, the event will take place mainly online. Click here for logistics details. On the homepage, there is a list of participating institutions. Here is a sampling of participants:

Columbia University
Cornell University
Emory University
Florida State University
Indiana University Purdue University – Indianapolis (IUPUI)
Penn State University
Purdue University
University of Arizona
University of California
University of California – San Diego

Even though this event is designed for students to help them get their “data organized, secure, and ready for write-up, sharing and reuse,” it is an excellent learning resource for business professionals to use as well.

Here is a really great Infographic that shows how search engines like Google and Bing work in 2016 from SEO Book. This quote is excellent: “The philosophy of modern search has thus moved away from starting with information and connecting it to an audience, to starting with the user and customizing the result page to them.”

How Do Search Engines Work?

Online Marketing Graphic by SEO Book

Coastal Creative’s infographic shows us “the next evolution of design for the upcoming year.”

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Erik Devaney, Editor of HubSpot’s ReadThink, has written an informative post on corporate jargon, or,“Why do business-people talk like that?”

It is easy to think light of corporate jargon. There is, however, a serious side to consider when performing research. Using the wrong search term(s) when researching is a leading factor in producing poor or irrelevant results. It is a good idea to brainstorm and identify all the various terms that can be used for keywords before starting to search. Being aware of what the current day jargon is, even though it can at times be silly, can be helpful in retrieving results that are current and relevant. One search strategy to consider when you are retrieving irrelevant results (we’ve all been there) is to use terms that you think the author might use in his or her writing, not what you think the author should use.

This article is filled with wonderful little nuggets such as:

“…the word jargon dates back to the Middle Ages and originally referred to a sound that birds made.”

“’Thinking outside the box,’ for example, is a reference to a logic puzzle, which requires that you connect a 3×3 ‘box’ of 9 dots using four straight lines or fewer — without lifting your pen or pencil off the paper…The trick is that you need to drag your line outside of the box in order to complete the puzzle.'”

“The term aboveboard, meanwhile, was likely born out of the requirement that card players keep their hands above the table as a way to discourage cheating.”

Perhaps the most interesting section focuses on the theories for its use, even though users know it can be incomprehensible or vague: Here are a few of the leading theories:

  1. It’s a power move. 
  2. It reinforces belonging. 
  3. It makes it easier to talk about uncomfortable topics. 

Lolly Daskal, President and CEO, Lead From Within, lists “30 of the best sites for professional and personal development. Learn as an individual or connect your team.” This is a great list!

Here are her top five, directly quoted. Click here to read the entire list on Inc.com.

1. TED Talks 
TED’s tagline is “ideas worth spreading.” TED Talks is a video collection in the form of short, powerful speeches on every subject imaginable (18 minutes or less).

2. Brain Pickings
Brain Pickings has interesting posts drawn from art, science, design, history, and philosophy.

3. 99U
99U’s actionable insights on productivity, organization, and leadership help creative people push ideas forward.

4. Lynda
Lynda has thousands of video tutorials covering technical, creative, and business skills, all taught by industry experts.

5. University of the People 
University of the People is a nonprofit, tuition-free online university based in California and committed to educational access and inclusion.

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Image Credit: Happy New Year 2016, by Julie Anne Johnson, via Flickr Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC by 2.0) license

Here are more lists that will help you decide what to read this year.

16 Must Read Business Books for 2016, Forbes, by David Burkus

6 Entrepreneur-Minded Books to Watch for in 2016, Orlando Business Journal, by Teresa Novellino

17 Must-Read Business Books Coming Soon in 2016, Ethos3, by Leslie Belknap

Spring 2016 Announcements: Business & Economics: Business Books with Impact, Publishers Weekly, by Jim Milliot

New Books for the New Year, BPL Kirstein Business Library, by Betsey Lippmeier

This infographic, as described by creator Raphael Lysander, is “82 delicious layers, 12 hours of work dedicated to those who adore reading…”

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