lyd2017

The second annual Love Your Data Week (LYD) is scheduled for February 13 – 17.

LYD week is conducted via social media and is coordinated by research data specialists, mostly working in academic and research libraries or data archives or centers. LYD aims to raise awareness about topics related to research data management, sharing, preservation, reuse, and library-based research data services. Practical tips, resources, and stories to help researchers at any stage in their career use good data practices will be shared.

You can add your institution to the list and see other 2017 participants here. You can find detailed information about each day’s activities/resources here.

“Graphic

This infographic was made with the graphic design software Venngage.

This infographic from MainPath shows how the brain processes different types of content such as written, graphic, interactive, and video. “The way the brain processes different types of content affects a viewer’s emotions and impressions.”

1608_ig_main-path_brains-and-content_v2

pexels-photo-46274

Having subscribed to a fair number of literary email services over the years, there is one that stands out in its ability to consistently educate, entertain, and inspire, and that service is Delanceyplace.

The name derives from the street where founder Richard Vague lives in Philadelphia.

The service is self described as a brief daily email “with an excerpt or quote we view as interesting or noteworthy, offered with commentary to provide context. There is no theme, except that most excerpts will come from a non-fiction work, mainly works of history, and we hope will have a more universal relevance than simply the subject of the book from which they came.”

In a letter to subscribers, Mr. Vague provides insight into how the eclectic content is selected. For example “real history” is highlighted that “has scars and disillusionment alongside victory.” He likes passages that quantify things, and those that encompass values such as compassion and helping others, and most important, resiliency (read the entire letter here).

And it gets better, Delanceyplace is strictly not-for-profit and the money made through books sold via the site is given to children’s literacy organizations.

Delanceyplace is delivered Monday through Friday and the site provides a searchable archive with briefings dating back to 2005.

One of my favorite briefs is entitled “An Octopus’s Favorite Arm,” and the selection is from The Soul of an Octopus, by Sy Montgomery. It focuses on research that indicates that each arm of an octopus has its own personality. “Octopuses are intelligent and aware, but how much of that is centrally located in their ‘brain.’ Is it possible that they have a ‘distributed mind’ with each arm having a mind of its own?”

explosion-firework-new-year-s-eve-december-31

There is an exciting new crop of business and leadership books coming in 2017 and here are anticipated titles from various published lists:

From Inc.com
Valley of the Gods: A Silicon Valley Story, by Alexandra Wolfe, Jan. 10
Own ItThe Power of Women at Work, by Sallie Krawcheck, Jan. 17
The Net and the Butterfly: The Art and Practice of Breakthrough Thinking, by Olivia Fox Cabane and Judah Pollack, Feb. 17
Stealing Fire: How Silicon Valley, the Navy SEALs, and Maverick Scientists Are Revolutionizing the Way We Live and Work, by Steven Kotler and Jamie Wheal, Feb. 21
The Great Question of Tomorrow: The Ideas that Will Remake the World (TED Books), by David Rothkopf, Apr. 18
American Kingpin: The Epic Hunt for the Criminal Mastermind Behind the Silk Road, by Nick Bilton, May 2
Psyched Up: How the Moments Before Any Challenge Determine Your Success, by Daniel McGinn, June 6
Many Teams, One Mission: A Blueprint for Building Your Team of Teams, by Chris Fussell and Charles Goodyear, July 11
The Power of Onlyness: How to Make Your Ideas Mighty Enough to Dent the World, by Nilofer Merchant, Aug. 29
Untitled Autobiography, by Ralph Lauren, Sept. 10

From TIME
Hit Refresh, by Satya Nadella (Microsoft CEO), fall 2017

From Signature Reads
Irresistible: The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked, by Adam Alter, Mar. 7

From The Washington Post
Mastering Civility: A Manifesto for the Workplace, by Christine Porath, Dec. 27
Own It: The Power of Women at Work, by Sallie Krawcheck, Jan. 17
Stretch: Unlock the Power of Less -and Achieve More Than You Ever Imagined, by Scott Sonenshein, Feb. 7
Madame President: The Extraordinary Journey of Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, by Helene Cooper, Mar. 7
Eyes Wide Open: Overcoming Obstacles and Recognizing Opportunities in a World That Can’t See Clearly, by Isaac Lidsky, Mar. 14
Radical Candor: Be a Kick-Ass Boss Without Losing Your Humanity, by Kim Scott, Mar. 14
Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience and Finding Joy, by Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant, Apr. 24
The Captain Class: The Driving Force Behind the World’s Greatest Teams, by Sam Walker, May 16
The Push: A Climber’s Journey of Endurance, Risk, and Going Beyond Limits, by Tommy Caldwell, May 16
Gorbachev: His Life and Times, by William Taubman, Sept. 7

From Publisher’s Weekly
The Airbnb Story: How Three Ordinary Guys Disrupted an Industry, Made Billions… and Created Plenty of Controversy, by Leigh Gallagher, Feb. 14
The CEO Pay Machine: How It Trashes America and How to Stop It, by Steven Clifford, May 16
Down and Out in the New Economy: How People Find (or Don’t Find) Work Today, by Ilana Gershon, Apr. 10
Making It: Why Manufacturing Still Matters, by Louis Uchitelle, May 2
Wild Ride: Inside Uber’s Quest for World Domination, by Adam Lashinsky, May 23

pexels-photo-workerBy Dr. Andrew Chamberlain, Chief Economist, Glassdoor, reports on trends that will shape the job market in 2017. Glassdoor, as stated in the report, “has a unique perspective on the labor market, with access to millions of real-time job listings, salaries and company reviews that helps [them] keep a pulse on what’s happening today in hiring, pay and the broader labor market.” The five trends identified are:

The transformation of HR into “people science” – Thanks to low-cost workforce analytics that provide data “on every stage of the employee life cycle,” companies will use data to make HR more scientific.

Automation will change every job – Even though automation mostly effects routine jobs, white collar jobs are also vulnerable. Ongoing skill building that complements technology is key for job seekers.

Shifting away from flashy benefits packages – “In coming years, we’re likely to see large tech employers re-evaluating their benefits packages, more carefully focusing them on core benefits that offer the biggest bang for the buck in terms of engagement and productivity — rather than splashy headlines about unusual workplace perks.”

Taking action against the gender pay gap – “In 2017 and beyond, we are likely to see more companies taking positive action on the gender pay gap, using HR data to correct problems proactively in their own payrolls.”

Realizing the limits of the “gig economy” – “The fastest growing jobs today are ones that require human creativity, flexibility, judgment, and ‘soft skills’ like personal relationships such as health care professionals, data scientists, sales leaders, strategy consultants, and product managers. Those are exactly the kind of jobs least likely to function well in a ‘gig’ economy platform.”

 

An interesting new Pew Research Center survey finds that a majority of Americans feel that information overload is a not problem for them and that they “are comfortable with their abilities to cope with information flows in their day-to-day lives.” In addition, owners of more devices “feel more on top of the data and media flows in their lives.” Findings also suggest that information overload is more situational: “Specific situations may arise, such as when institutions impose high information demands on people for transactions, which create a sense of information burden for some Americans.”

pi_2016_12_07_information-overload_0-01