Photo Credit: Reading Poetry, by Pedro Ribeiro Simoes, via Flickr, Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC By 2.0) license

Photo Credit: Reading Poetry, by Pedro Ribeiro Simoes, via Flickr, Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC By 2.0) license

The Associated Press (AP) recently ran a story about an interesting set of contests that will run through the upcoming academic year at Dartmouth to determine whether people can distinguish between human and computer-generated creativity. AP’s Holly Ramer (picked up here via ABC News), states: “Dartmouth is seeking artificial intelligence algorithms that create ‘human-quality’ short stories, sonnets and dance music sets that will be pitted against human-produced literature, poetry and music selections. The judges won’t know which is which.” What makes these contests (named DigiLit, PoetiX and Algorhythms) unique “is the evaluation by judges who will try to determine whether the work was generated by computers or humans and whether people prefer the computer-generated work…it will be interesting to see who does the judging — fooling a publisher with a computer-generated short story would be more significant than fooling the average reader, for example.”

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