O Palsson, The Library and Learning Center by Zaha Hadid, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Austria, via Flickr, Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC by 2.0) license

O Palsson, The Library and Learning Center by Zaha Hadid, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Austria, via Flickr, Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC by 2.0) license

Futurist Thomas Frey (DaVinci Institute, August 6) writes in an interesting article entitled, “The Future of Libraries: Beginning the Great Transformation”:

We have transitioned from a time where information was scarce and precious to today where information is vast and readily available, and in many cases, free…People who in the past visited libraries to find specific pieces of information are now able to find that information online. The vast majority of people with specific information needs no longer visit libraries.  However, others who read for pleasure as example, still regularly patronize their local library.

The Institute has put together ten trends “that are affecting the development of the next generation library,” and also “give clear insight into the rapidly changing technologies and equally fast changing mindset of library patrons.” Here are the trends (directly quoted). Click here to read more detail about each trend.

Trend #1 – Communication systems are continually changing the way people access information

Trend #2 – All technology ends. All technologies commonly used today will be replaced by something new.

Trend #3 – We haven’t yet reached the ultimate small particle for storage. But soon.

Trend #4 – Search Technology will become increasingly more complicated

Trend #5 – Time compression is changing the lifestyle of library patrons

Trend #6 – Over time we will be transitioning to a verbal society

Trend #7 – The demand for global information is growing exponentially

Trend #8 – The Stage is being set for a new era of Global Systems

Trend #9 – We are transitioning from a product-based economy to an experience based economy

Trend #10 – Libraries will transition from a center of information to a center of culture

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