Archives for category: Innovation

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This will be the last post I write for simplybusinessresearch. For five years I have been covering topics of interest about writing, books, innovation, libraries, and business trends – a true hodgepodge! My business, Cottrill Research, has been consuming more and more of my time. There are exciting new initiatives I will be pursuing with Cottrill Research and have decided to retire simplybusinessresearch. Who knows maybe in a few years I will pick it back up, but until then, goodbye. It’s been a true joy sharing content with fellow lovers of books and innovative thought.

As part of its 10th anniversary celebration, The National Art Center, Tokyo featured Emmanuelle Moureaux’s installation “Forest of Numbers.”

As stated on emmanuelle moureaux architecture + design’s website, the installation, which visualized the decade of the future from 2017 to 2026, “created a sense of stillness across the large exhibition space. More than 60,000 pieces of suspended numeral figures from 0 to 9 were regularly aligned in three dimensional grids. A section was removed, [creating] a path that cut through the installation, [inviting] visitors to wonder inside the colorful forest filled with numbers. The installation was composed of 10 layers which is the representation of 10 years time. Each layer employed 4 digits to express the relevant year such as 2, 0, 1, and 7 for 2017, which were randomly positioned on the grids. As part of Emmanuelle’s ‘100 colors’ installation series, the layers of time were colored in 100 shades of colors, created a colorful time travel through the forest.”

 

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Photo by Erkan Utu, CC0 license, via Pexels

Beyond Search, which is a 10-year-old publication that focuses on enterprise search and content processing, is changing its focus to cover products and services related to voice-centric information access by introducing a new blog, Beyond Alexa. Stephen E. Arnold writes: “The idea is that Alexa has become an interesting product niche, but the impact of voice-related information access is now changing rapidly. Frankly it is more dynamic than the decades old keyword search business.” I couldn’t agree more. He also states: “Since early 2008, we have tracked the keyword centric approach to finding and making sense of information. Our changing focus reflects the fact that I wrote about years ago in Searcher Magazine. Keyword search linked to a keyboard, if not dead, was headed for marginalization…We think there’s more ‘beyond’ Alexa. We want to explore the new world of ubiquitous and Teflon-slick information access.” For a related post, please see Voice Search is Growing and is Different Than Keywords in a Search Box.

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There is an exciting new crop of business and leadership books coming in 2017 and here are anticipated titles from various published lists:

From Inc.com
Valley of the Gods: A Silicon Valley Story, by Alexandra Wolfe, Jan. 10
Own ItThe Power of Women at Work, by Sallie Krawcheck, Jan. 17
The Net and the Butterfly: The Art and Practice of Breakthrough Thinking, by Olivia Fox Cabane and Judah Pollack, Feb. 17
Stealing Fire: How Silicon Valley, the Navy SEALs, and Maverick Scientists Are Revolutionizing the Way We Live and Work, by Steven Kotler and Jamie Wheal, Feb. 21
The Great Question of Tomorrow: The Ideas that Will Remake the World (TED Books), by David Rothkopf, Apr. 18
American Kingpin: The Epic Hunt for the Criminal Mastermind Behind the Silk Road, by Nick Bilton, May 2
Psyched Up: How the Moments Before Any Challenge Determine Your Success, by Daniel McGinn, June 6
Many Teams, One Mission: A Blueprint for Building Your Team of Teams, by Chris Fussell and Charles Goodyear, July 11
The Power of Onlyness: How to Make Your Ideas Mighty Enough to Dent the World, by Nilofer Merchant, Aug. 29
Untitled Autobiography, by Ralph Lauren, Sept. 10

From TIME
Hit Refresh, by Satya Nadella (Microsoft CEO), fall 2017

From Signature Reads
Irresistible: The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked, by Adam Alter, Mar. 7

From The Washington Post
Mastering Civility: A Manifesto for the Workplace, by Christine Porath, Dec. 27
Own It: The Power of Women at Work, by Sallie Krawcheck, Jan. 17
Stretch: Unlock the Power of Less -and Achieve More Than You Ever Imagined, by Scott Sonenshein, Feb. 7
Madame President: The Extraordinary Journey of Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, by Helene Cooper, Mar. 7
Eyes Wide Open: Overcoming Obstacles and Recognizing Opportunities in a World That Can’t See Clearly, by Isaac Lidsky, Mar. 14
Radical Candor: Be a Kick-Ass Boss Without Losing Your Humanity, by Kim Scott, Mar. 14
Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience and Finding Joy, by Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant, Apr. 24
The Captain Class: The Driving Force Behind the World’s Greatest Teams, by Sam Walker, May 16
The Push: A Climber’s Journey of Endurance, Risk, and Going Beyond Limits, by Tommy Caldwell, May 16
Gorbachev: His Life and Times, by William Taubman, Sept. 7

From Publisher’s Weekly
The Airbnb Story: How Three Ordinary Guys Disrupted an Industry, Made Billions… and Created Plenty of Controversy, by Leigh Gallagher, Feb. 14
The CEO Pay Machine: How It Trashes America and How to Stop It, by Steven Clifford, May 16
Down and Out in the New Economy: How People Find (or Don’t Find) Work Today, by Ilana Gershon, Apr. 10
Making It: Why Manufacturing Still Matters, by Louis Uchitelle, May 2
Wild Ride: Inside Uber’s Quest for World Domination, by Adam Lashinsky, May 23

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Photo by Joao Silas via Unsplash

In an article announcing the 2016 annual awards longlist, 800-CEO-READ’s Editorial Director Dylan Schleicher, makes an interesting observation about this year’s best business books:

While speed, innovation, big data, and disruption are the business buzzwords of the day, the best books of 2016 argue for a more considered and considerate, human-centered, inclusive, and deliberately constructive approach to business. Change is in the air and technology is on the rise, but business is still a human pursuit, and should be humane. In a media climate dominated by Twitterstorms and sound bites, it is important to dive deeper into the issues and inform ourselves more fully before taking action. These books help do that.

Here is the longlist for the 2016 800-CEO-READ Business Book Awards:

LEADERSHIP & STRATEGY

  • The Founder’s Mentality: How to Overcome the Predictable Crises of Growth by Chris Zook & James Allen
  • Off-Centered Leadership: The Dogfish Head Guide to Motivation, Collaboration and Smart Growth by Sam Calagione
  • Play Bigger: How Pirates, Dreamers, and Innovators Create and Dominate Markets by Al Ramadan, Dave Peterson, Christopher Lochhead, Kevin Maney
  • Scaling Lean: Mastering the Key Metrics for Startup Growth by Ash Maurya
  • Simply Brilliant: How Great Organizations Do Ordinary Things in Extraordinary Ways by William C. Taylor

MANAGEMENT & WORKPLACE CULTURE

  • Communication the Cleveland Clinic Way: How to Drive a Relationship-Centered Strategy for Superior Patient Experience, edited by Adrienne Boissy, MD and Timothy Gilligan, MD
  • An Everyone Culture: Becoming a Deliberately Developmental Organization by Robert Kegan and Lisa Laskow Lahey
  • Feminist Fight Club: An Office Survival Manual for a Sexist Workplace by Jessica Bennett
  • Under New Management: How Leading Organizations Are Upending Business as Usual by David Burkus
  • Winning Well: A Manager’s Guide to Getting Results—Without Losing Your Soul by Karin Hurt and David Dye

MARKETING & SALES

  • Hug Your Haters: How to Embrace Complaints and Keep Your Customers by Jay Baer
  • Martketing: The Heart and the Brain of Branding by Javier Sanchez Lamelas
  • Never Split the Difference: Negotiating as If Your Life Depended on It by Chris Voss with Tahl Raz
  • The Power of Fifty Bits: The New Science of Turning Good Intentions Into Positive Results by Bob Nease
  • Small Data: The Tiny Clues That Uncover Huge Trends by Martin Lindstrom

INNOVATION & CREATIVITY

  • Art Thinking: How to Carve Out Creative Space in a World of Schedules, Budgets, and Bosses by Amy Whitaker
  • Smarter Faster Better: The Secrets of Being Productive in Life and Business by Charles Duhigg
  • Utopia Is Creepy: And Other Provocations by Nicholas Carr
  • Wonderland: How Play Made the Modern World by Steven Johnson
  • You Got This!: Unleash Your Awesomeness, Find Your Path, and Change Your World by Maya S. Penn

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT & HUMAN BEHAVIOR

  • Becoming Wise: An Inquiry Into the Mystery and Art of Living by Krista Tippett
  • The Confidence Game: Why We Fall for It… Every Time by Maria Konnikova
  • Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World by Cal Newport
  • How to Have a Good Day: Harness the Power of Behavioral Science to Transform Your Working Life by Caroline Webb
  • Joy on Demand: The Art of Discovering the Happiness Within by Chade Meng Tan

CURRENT EVENTS & PUBLIC AFFAIRS

  • Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond
  • Free Speech: Ten Principles for a Connected World by Timothy Garton Ash
  • Makers and Takers: The Rise of Finance and the Fall of American Business by Rana Foroohar
  • Shadow Courts: The Tribunals That Rule Global Trade by Haley Sweetland Edwards
  • Who Cooked Adam Smith’s Dinner?: A Story of Women and Economics by Katrine Marcal

NARRATIVE & BIOGRAPHY

  • Breaking Rockefeller: The Incredible Story of the Ambitious Rivals Who Toppled an Oil Empire by Peter B. Doran
  • Door to Door: The Magnificent, Maddening, Mysterious World of Transportation by Edward Humes
  • How to Make a Spaceship: A Band of Renegades, an Epic Race, and the Birth of Private Spaceflight by Julian Guthrie
  • The Man Who Knew: The Life and Times of Alan Greenspan by Sebastian Mallaby
  • The Network: The Battle for the Airwaves and the Birth of the Communications Age by Scott Woolley

BIG IDEAS & NEW PERSPECTIVES

  • The End of Average: How We Succeed in a World That Values Sameness by Todd Rose
  • Magic and Loss: The Internet as Art by Virginia Heffernan
  • The Smartest Places on Earth: Why Rustbelts Are the Emerging Hotspots of Global Innovation by Antoine van Agtmael and Fred Bakker
  • Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus: How Growth Became the Enemy of Prosperity by Douglas Rushkoff
  • What Works: Gender Equality by Design by Iris Bohnet

 

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Photo by Thomas Litangen via Unsplash

Virginia Woolf’s classic essay, A Room of One’s Own, was written in 1929 and explores, in regards to woman and fiction, the opinion that a woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction. A woman at that time, due to social restrictions, had limited resources, space, privacy and time, all of which are needed to create and write fiction.

Fast-forward to today and a variation on the theme of independence can be explored that pertains to both men and women and includes the world of business. It is about creating an environment that allows for intellectual freedom. One way for business professionals and others who wish to grow creatively and intellectually outside their places of work, is to start businesses of their own.

Starting a business today is vastly different than starting one in the past. The main reason for this is due to, thanks to technology and innovation, the development of open access resources and tools. Starting and running a business in the past required a great deal of investment. Now, the availability of open access resources offer not only high quality, but economical options and opportunities as well.

Here are just a few examples of open access resources and tools and their uses. There are many, many more available:

  • Marketing/Social Media – LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest
  • Social Media Monitoring – Social Mention, Icerocket, Hootsuite
  • Marketing/Communications – blogging sites such as WordPress and Medium
  • Marketing/Design – Canva allows you to design and create professional presentations, flyers, documents, infographics, and more
  • Business and Market Research – SEC filings, Google Trends, Owler, SimilarWeb, Kompass. Emergence of government data combined with analytics
  • Accounting – GnuCash, Wave
  • Virtual Meetings – JoinMe, Google Hangouts, AnyMeeting

Today, it truly is possible to create a personal environment to freely pursue intellectual endeavors. Lucky for us that we live in a time where high quality open access tools and resources are readily available.

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Photo by Daniella Winkler via Unsplash

Here is a strong contender for the best quote of 2016: “We talk a lot about information and the information age, but really what I think people are looking for is wisdom and knowledge.” -David Pescovitz, co-editor at Boing Boing and research director at the Institute for the Future.

Pescovitz, in a recent Business Insider article written by Chris Weller, offers some futuristic views on how libraries are going to change in 50 years’ time. Read the entire article here.

Highlights:

Libraries “are poised to become all-in-one spaces for learning, consuming, sharing, creating, and experiencing — to the extent that enormous banks of data will allow people to ‘check out’ brand-new realities [experiences], whether that’s scaling Mt. Everest or living out an afternoon as a dog.”

“What probably won’t change that much are librarians and the physical spaces they watch over…humans will always need some sort of guide to make a foreign landscape more familiar. Whether humanity turns that job into one for artificial intelligence is another matter.”