Archives for category: Motivation

This infographic from MainPath shows how the brain processes different types of content such as written, graphic, interactive, and video. “The way the brain processes different types of content affects a viewer’s emotions and impressions.”

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Photo by Joao Silas via Unsplash

In an article announcing the 2016 annual awards longlist, 800-CEO-READ’s Editorial Director Dylan Schleicher, makes an interesting observation about this year’s best business books:

While speed, innovation, big data, and disruption are the business buzzwords of the day, the best books of 2016 argue for a more considered and considerate, human-centered, inclusive, and deliberately constructive approach to business. Change is in the air and technology is on the rise, but business is still a human pursuit, and should be humane. In a media climate dominated by Twitterstorms and sound bites, it is important to dive deeper into the issues and inform ourselves more fully before taking action. These books help do that.

Here is the longlist for the 2016 800-CEO-READ Business Book Awards:

LEADERSHIP & STRATEGY

  • The Founder’s Mentality: How to Overcome the Predictable Crises of Growth by Chris Zook & James Allen
  • Off-Centered Leadership: The Dogfish Head Guide to Motivation, Collaboration and Smart Growth by Sam Calagione
  • Play Bigger: How Pirates, Dreamers, and Innovators Create and Dominate Markets by Al Ramadan, Dave Peterson, Christopher Lochhead, Kevin Maney
  • Scaling Lean: Mastering the Key Metrics for Startup Growth by Ash Maurya
  • Simply Brilliant: How Great Organizations Do Ordinary Things in Extraordinary Ways by William C. Taylor

MANAGEMENT & WORKPLACE CULTURE

  • Communication the Cleveland Clinic Way: How to Drive a Relationship-Centered Strategy for Superior Patient Experience, edited by Adrienne Boissy, MD and Timothy Gilligan, MD
  • An Everyone Culture: Becoming a Deliberately Developmental Organization by Robert Kegan and Lisa Laskow Lahey
  • Feminist Fight Club: An Office Survival Manual for a Sexist Workplace by Jessica Bennett
  • Under New Management: How Leading Organizations Are Upending Business as Usual by David Burkus
  • Winning Well: A Manager’s Guide to Getting Results—Without Losing Your Soul by Karin Hurt and David Dye

MARKETING & SALES

  • Hug Your Haters: How to Embrace Complaints and Keep Your Customers by Jay Baer
  • Martketing: The Heart and the Brain of Branding by Javier Sanchez Lamelas
  • Never Split the Difference: Negotiating as If Your Life Depended on It by Chris Voss with Tahl Raz
  • The Power of Fifty Bits: The New Science of Turning Good Intentions Into Positive Results by Bob Nease
  • Small Data: The Tiny Clues That Uncover Huge Trends by Martin Lindstrom

INNOVATION & CREATIVITY

  • Art Thinking: How to Carve Out Creative Space in a World of Schedules, Budgets, and Bosses by Amy Whitaker
  • Smarter Faster Better: The Secrets of Being Productive in Life and Business by Charles Duhigg
  • Utopia Is Creepy: And Other Provocations by Nicholas Carr
  • Wonderland: How Play Made the Modern World by Steven Johnson
  • You Got This!: Unleash Your Awesomeness, Find Your Path, and Change Your World by Maya S. Penn

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT & HUMAN BEHAVIOR

  • Becoming Wise: An Inquiry Into the Mystery and Art of Living by Krista Tippett
  • The Confidence Game: Why We Fall for It… Every Time by Maria Konnikova
  • Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World by Cal Newport
  • How to Have a Good Day: Harness the Power of Behavioral Science to Transform Your Working Life by Caroline Webb
  • Joy on Demand: The Art of Discovering the Happiness Within by Chade Meng Tan

CURRENT EVENTS & PUBLIC AFFAIRS

  • Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond
  • Free Speech: Ten Principles for a Connected World by Timothy Garton Ash
  • Makers and Takers: The Rise of Finance and the Fall of American Business by Rana Foroohar
  • Shadow Courts: The Tribunals That Rule Global Trade by Haley Sweetland Edwards
  • Who Cooked Adam Smith’s Dinner?: A Story of Women and Economics by Katrine Marcal

NARRATIVE & BIOGRAPHY

  • Breaking Rockefeller: The Incredible Story of the Ambitious Rivals Who Toppled an Oil Empire by Peter B. Doran
  • Door to Door: The Magnificent, Maddening, Mysterious World of Transportation by Edward Humes
  • How to Make a Spaceship: A Band of Renegades, an Epic Race, and the Birth of Private Spaceflight by Julian Guthrie
  • The Man Who Knew: The Life and Times of Alan Greenspan by Sebastian Mallaby
  • The Network: The Battle for the Airwaves and the Birth of the Communications Age by Scott Woolley

BIG IDEAS & NEW PERSPECTIVES

  • The End of Average: How We Succeed in a World That Values Sameness by Todd Rose
  • Magic and Loss: The Internet as Art by Virginia Heffernan
  • The Smartest Places on Earth: Why Rustbelts Are the Emerging Hotspots of Global Innovation by Antoine van Agtmael and Fred Bakker
  • Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus: How Growth Became the Enemy of Prosperity by Douglas Rushkoff
  • What Works: Gender Equality by Design by Iris Bohnet

 

Lolly Daskal, President and CEO, Lead From Within, lists “30 of the best sites for professional and personal development. Learn as an individual or connect your team.” This is a great list!

Here are her top five, directly quoted. Click here to read the entire list on Inc.com.

1. TED Talks 
TED’s tagline is “ideas worth spreading.” TED Talks is a video collection in the form of short, powerful speeches on every subject imaginable (18 minutes or less).

2. Brain Pickings
Brain Pickings has interesting posts drawn from art, science, design, history, and philosophy.

3. 99U
99U’s actionable insights on productivity, organization, and leadership help creative people push ideas forward.

4. Lynda
Lynda has thousands of video tutorials covering technical, creative, and business skills, all taught by industry experts.

5. University of the People 
University of the People is a nonprofit, tuition-free online university based in California and committed to educational access and inclusion.

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Image Credit: Happy New Year 2016, by Julie Anne Johnson, via Flickr Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC by 2.0) license

Here are more lists that will help you decide what to read this year.

16 Must Read Business Books for 2016, Forbes, by David Burkus

6 Entrepreneur-Minded Books to Watch for in 2016, Orlando Business Journal, by Teresa Novellino

17 Must-Read Business Books Coming Soon in 2016, Ethos3, by Leslie Belknap

Spring 2016 Announcements: Business & Economics: Business Books with Impact, Publishers Weekly, by Jim Milliot

New Books for the New Year, BPL Kirstein Business Library, by Betsey Lippmeier

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Image Credit: New Year Eve’s Party Favors, by Shari’s Berries via Flickr Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC by 2.0) license

As the new year approaches, readers will start turning their attention to what they will read in 2016. These posts will give you a heads up on what will be available – and also, worth reading.

10 Must-Read Business Books for 2016, Inc, by Anna Hensel

Nine Leadership Books to Watch for in 2016, The Washington Post, by Jena McGregor

Nine Business Books to Read in 2016, Stanford Graduate School of Business, by Natalie White (these are reading recommendations from alumni entrepreneurs and the books are not necessarily new releases)

15 New Business Books to Look For in 2016, Grasshopper Blog, by Kiera Abbamonte

10 New Leadership Books You Must Read in 2016, Small Business Trends, by Ivana Taylor

3 Books That Can Help You Be Better in 2016, and Beyond, Fortune, by Jonathan Chew

Years ago, I researched and compiled a list of business management classics. These titles were selected because they introduced new, groundbreaking ideas and practices that were influential in moving the discipline forward. Ultimately, they play an important part in the history of business management thought leadership.

The Achieving Society (1961). David C. McClelland. This book identifies achievement motivation as an important psychological foundation for economic development.

Administrative Behavior: A Study of Decision-Making Processes in Administrative Organizations (1947). Herbert A. Simon. A “ground-breaking” work in which Simon applied his pioneering theory of human choice to administrative decision-making.

A Behavioral Theory of the Firm (1963). Richard M. Cyert and James G. March. This is a classic work in organizational theory, and it is one of the most significant contributions to improving the theory of the firm.

Competitive Strategy: Techniques for Analyzing Industries and Competitors (1980). Michael E. Porter. This highly influential book has transformed the theory and practice in the field of business strategy. Introduced is the famous Five Forces framework.

The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of the Learning Organization (1990). Peter M. Senge. Senge’s “path-breaking” book draws on science, spiritual wisdom, psychology, and the cutting edge of management thought to show how businesses can overcome their “learning disabilities” and beat the odds of failure.

The Forest Ranger: A Study in Administrative Behavior (1960). Herbert Kaufman. This landmark case study details how, in a large dispersed organization, like the Forest Service, top managers are able to shape the behavior of field officers into a coherent, unified program.

The Functions of the Executive (1938). Chester I. Bernard. Mr. Bernard’s thinking on the importance of communication is still relevant to modern management.

The Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement (1993). Eliyahu M Goldratt. This business book, disguised as a novel, is about a manager that discovers a revolutionary new way to do business. Mr. Goldratt explains the technique of optimized production technology.

How to Win Friends and Influence People (1936). Dale Carnegie. This book is based on courses in public speaking that had been taught by Dale Carnegie and was designed to help professional people do better in business by helping them make social contacts and improve their speaking skills.

The Human Problems of an Industrial Civilization (1933). Elton Mayo. Here Mayo discusses the Hawthorne experiments, which shows the important link between workforce morale and organizational performance.

The Human Side of Enterprise (1960). Douglas M. McGregor. McGregor’s revolutionary Theory Y – which contends that individuals are self-motivated and self-directed – and Theory X – in which employees must be commanded and  controlled – has been widely taught in business schools for over four decades.

In Search of Excellence: Lessons from America’s Best-Run Companies (1982). Tom Peters and Robert Waterman. Based on a study of forty-three of America’s best-run companies, In Search of Excellence describes eight basic principles of management that made these organizations successful.

In the Shadow of Organization (1981). Robert B. Denhardt. This book deals with the dilemma of individual autonomy in an organizational society.

Industrial Organization: Theory and Practice (1965). Joan Woodward. This book  was a major contribution to the development of contingency theory and our understanding of the relationship between technology and organizations.

Management and the Worker (1939). Fritz J. Roethlisberger and William J. Dickson. This is the official account of the famous experiments carried out at the Hawthorne Works of the Eastern Electric Company in Chicago. The results of these experiments greatly influenced the Human Resources movement.

The Management of Innovation (1961). Tom Burns and George M. Stalker. This influential book on organization theory addresses the relationship between an organization and its market and the technological environment.

Motivation and Personality (1954). Abraham H. Maslow. Maslow’s hierarchy of needs contributed to the research of motivation and the emergence of human relations as a discipline.

My Years with General Motors (1964). Alfred P. Sloan. This personal memoir describes the strategies Mr. Sloan used to build GM into what at that time was the world’s largest and most successful industrial company.

The One Minute Manager (1981). Kenneth Blanchard and Spencer Johnson. An easy read, this book simplifies rules that can guarantee increased productivity, profits, and job satisfaction.

Organization and Environment: Managing Differentiation and Integration (1967). Paul R. Lawrence and Jay W. Lorsch. The authors, in a retrospective review, state that this book’s enduring contribution is the “contingency idea that organizations function most effectively when tailored and designed to mesh with their chosen environments.”

Organizations (1958). James G. march and Herbert A. Simon. Written by two of the world’s most important contributors to the field, Organizations has become a classic work in organization theory.

Organizations in Action: Social Science Bases of Administrative Theory (1967). James D. Thompson. Organizations in Action is a classic multidisciplinary study of the behavior of complex organizations as entities.

Out of the Crisis (1986). W. Edwards Deming (1986). Deming is regarded as the leading figure on quality. Here he offers a theory of management based on his 14 Points for Management.

The Practice of Management (1954). Peter F. Drucker. Mr. Drucker is widely  considered to be the father of modern management. The Practice of Management created the discipline of modern management practices.

The Principles of Scientific Management (1911). Frederick W. Taylor. Many consider this the most influential book on management ever published. This classic, controversial at times, of decision theory and managerial technique has helped administrators eliminate inefficiency since 1911.

Reengineering the Corporation: A Manifesto for Business Revolution (1993). Michael Hammer. The reengineering revolution hit hard in the 1990s, and this was the “must read” book by the leading reengineering guru.

Strategy and Structure: Chapters in the History of American Enterprise (1962). Alfred D. Chandler. This book shows how the seventy largest corporations in America have dealt with a single economic problem: the effective administration of an expanding business.

 

Image Credit: Kate Ter Haar, A book that is shut is but a block. ~Thomas Fuller, via Flickr Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC by 2.0) license

Image Credit: Kate Ter Haar, A book that is shut is but a block. ~Thomas Fuller, via Flickr Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC by 2.0) license

Business Insider’s Drake Baer and Mike Nudelman have complied an interesting list of 50 popular books and summarized each in a one-word sentence. They also recommend the list for great reading. You can read the entire list here. Here are my favorites (directly quoted).

Give and Take, by Adam Grant – Givers – people who try to benefit others in their interactions – are the most successful people, since they create durable, career-enabling relationships.

Man’s Search for Meaning, by Vicktor Frankl – People are motivated more by meaning than by pleasure or even happiness.

Rework, by Jason Fried and David Heinemeier Hansson – A lot of the accepted business wisdom – that workaholics are heroes, that a great resume signals a great candidate, and that you need outside investors – is completely false.

The Black Swan, by Nassim Taleb – People are very good at fooling themselves into thinking they know much more than they do, which makes it easy for big, unusual events to surprise us.

Strengthsfinder 2.0, by Tom Rath – Instead of fixing your shortcomings, develop your strengths.

The 4-Hour Workweek, by Tim Ferriss – Success is a matter of designing the life you want to lead.

Business Adventures, by John Brooks – People have been brilliant and idiotic in business for decades.