Archives for posts with tag: ebooks

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This will be the last post I write for simplybusinessresearch. For five years I have been covering topics of interest about writing, books, innovation, libraries, and business trends – a true hodgepodge! My business, Cottrill Research, has been consuming more and more of my time. There are exciting new initiatives I will be pursuing with Cottrill Research and have decided to retire simplybusinessresearch. Who knows maybe in a few years I will pick it back up, but until then, goodbye. It’s been a true joy sharing content with fellow lovers of books and innovative thought.

dpla

Digital Public Library of America

Ebook Friendly’s Piotr Kowalczyk provides an updated list of sites that offer free public domain books in electronic and audio format. Piotr writes:

Every year new publications enter public domain. That means their intellectual property rights have expired or are not applicable any longer. The content of these works becomes available for public use. Anyone is free to use it – but also to reuse it, for instance publish a new edition. Therefore you may find in major ebookstores (Kindle, Nook, Kobo, iBook Store, or Google Play Books) public domain books that are not free. My advice is that if you want to get an ebook version of a classic novel like Pride and Prejudice, you should first check out the sites listed below. Browsing the ebookstore where you have an account is a next step, if you don’t find what you’re looking for.

Here’s a sampling of sites provided:

1. Project Gutenberg – Project Gutenberg is a top destination for free ebooks on the web. It’s [the] first ebook initiative in the world, established by Michael S. Hart in 1971.

2. Europeana – Europeana offers access to millions of digitized items from European museums, libraries, and archives.

3. Digital Public Library of America – DPLA is aimed at giving universal access to digital resources of American libraries and archives.

4. Internet Archive – The website is a huge repository of text, audio and video files, including public domain titles. You can browse and read online over 5 million books and items from over 1,500 collections.

5. Open Library – The site is a project of the Internet Archive and is intended to create “one web page for every book ever published.”

into the primitive

Photo by Lou Levit via Unsplash

Association of American Publishers (AAP) StatShot Annual survey provides insight into sales and volume data collected for categories that include trade (fiction/non-fiction/religious), K-12 instructional materials, higher education course materials, university presses and professional books. Interesting highlights from the press release include:

The area of largest growth for the trade category was Adult Books. Adult non-fiction books sold the most units and provided the most revenue in the trade category for the second consecutive year. Within the Adult Books category, the fastest growing formats in terms of units sold were downloaded audio (up 45.9%), hardback (up 15.1%) and paperback (up 9.1%).

For trade formats:

Downloaded audio: Revenue for downloaded audio has nearly doubled since 2012. From 2014 to 2015, the growth was substantial: 37.6% in revenue and 41.1% in units.

eBooks: After peaking in 2013 eBook revenue declined in 2014 and again in 2015. Unit sales also declined with eBooks now making up 17.3% of the trade book market.

Paperback books: Paperbacks remain the most popular format in terms of units sold, comprising 40.6% of the market.

Hardback books: Hardback books saw growth in both revenue and units over 2014.

 

The StatShot Annual Executive Report with all corresponding data will be available later this summer. To place an advance order: tjordan@publishers.org.

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The universal mission of public libraries is to serve and meet the cultural and information needs of their local communities. The business community, without doubt, is an important sector and services are offered with the goal to help local businesses thrive. Unfortunately, many businesses do not know about all the wonderful resources that are available. Here is a list and reasons why businesses, both large and small, should be utilizing the offerings provided by public libraries. It is not necessary to physically visit the library, as most resources are available in 24/7 accessible digital formats.

Business Research Databases

Accessing quality business research data can be expensive and many times the high cost of business databases limits the purchasing of these types of resources. Most public libraries have at least one or two databases that provide company and industry information and access to key business and trade publications. Larger libraries provide access to many of the databases widely used in corporations. Databases that provide the ability to create targeted company lists for sales and supplier identification are commonly available.

Business Publications

It’s true that your business probably subscribes to the key trade publications that are important in the industry in which you practice. What to do when you want to read more than just a select few? The library has access to many key business journals, in addition to local and regional business newspapers (which are important for searching small, private companies). For general business, Zinio is a service that provides access to magazines online and there a Business/Finance genre where publications can be viewed/downloaded.

Business Books

The business book collection in your local library will contain titles that are hot off the press, popular titles, and classics. Business books can be expensive to purchase, which might limit the enthusiasm to read and keep current. Many books can be downloaded on a device of choice from Overdrive or Hoopla and enjoyed while you are commuting to work or jogging around the block.

Books, Music, and Movies for Enjoyment or Relaxation

Download or check out the latest best sellers, songs, or movies. Enjoying fiction and non-fiction books either by reading or listening to them lets you get far away from the stresses of work. Libraries have unique and excellent DVD collections that include hard-to-find foreign films and documentaries.

Access to Search Experts

Many librarians take on subject expert roles, and there is a good chance that one of your local librarians has expertise in business research. Tap into that knowledge to learn the best resources to use for your information need and how to perform research that gets results. Research and digging up information is what reference librarians truly love to do and the harder the challenge, the better!

Free Meeting Spaces

If you are a solopreneur and don’t want to meet clients at your home office (and want a break from the usual coffee shop) the library has small meeting rooms available for free.

Interlibrary Loan Service

Let the librarians find that obscure or hard-to-get article, report, or book. If your local library does not have what you need, the librarians can make a loan request to a lending library, anywhere in the country.

Free Wi-Fi and Computer Use

Many professionals do not work in an office and often work with a laptop anywhere there is a Wi-Fi connection. Also, computers are available for use, along with printers and scanners. As a minimum, expect most to have all the Office applications available.

 

There are two days in early March that celebrate reading: March 2 is National Read Across America Day and March 3 is World Book Day. Keeping with the theme of books and celebrating, today a New York Times article, written by Alexandra Alter, reports that Barnes & Noble “had another not-so-bad quarter.” The article, entitled, “Why Barnes & Noble Isn’t Going Away Yet,” reveals that even though the chain’s retail sales last quarter were down compared with a year earlier, sales of goods other than books, (toys, games, vinyl records, adult coloring books) grew 12.5 percent.

Here are reasons listed by Ms. Alter on why things might be looking up for Barnes & Noble and independent booksellers as well. They are:

  • Paperback sales grew and e-book sales fell in the first 10 months of 2015
  • The bookstore industry is rebounding (although Barnes & Noble plans to close 8 stores this year, which is the lowest in 16 years)
  • According to the American Booksellers Association, the number of independent bookstores is on the rise

In January 2013, I wrote a brief post about a Knowledge@Wharton article entitled, “Barnes & Noble, the Last Big Bookseller Standing: But for How Long?” This sobering question was raised in the article: Would consumers miss Barnes & Noble if it disappeared? My answer: “Personally, there is a certain reverence when entering any bookstore, regardless how big, and that I would miss very much.” In light of this, the fact that Barnes & Noble “had another not-so-bad quarter,” is a reason, in my book, to celebrate.

Jane's Bookstore, by Bill Lapp, via Flickr Attribution 2. Generic (CC by 2.0) license

Jane’s Bookstore, by Bill Lapp, via Flickr, Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC by 2.0) license

Fortune’s Bill Wahba, in his article, Book Sales Hang On, As E-Books Wither, writes that “print books are holding steady” in comparison to e-books, based on sales and market share. Directly quoted highlights of the article:

In the first five months of 2015, publishers’ revenues from e-books sales fell 10% to $610.8 million, according to the Association of American Publishers, compared to a 2.3% drop in print book sales in the fiction, non fiction and religious categories (that the industry calls trade books.)

In terms of market share, e-books generated 24.9% of publisher revenues between January and May, down from a peak of 26.5% in the year earlier period, according to the AAP, showing how print books have finally started to push back against e-books’ meteoric rise.

In its most recent quarter, Barnes & Noble reported comparable sales in its core business rose 1%, while its Nook e-reader and digital content sales fell 22.4%.

According to a New York Times article, the American Booksellers Association counted 1,712 member stores in 2,227 locations in 2015, up from 1,410 in 1,660 locations five years ago.

Brand new research from Pew Research Center, in a report entitled Libraries at the Crossroads, reveals what the public desires from community libraries.

According to results, many Americans say they want public libraries to:

  • support local education;
  • serve special constituents such as veterans, active-duty military personnel and immigrants;
  • help local businesses, job seekers and those upgrading their work skills;
  • embrace new technologies such as 3-D printers and provide services to help patrons learn about high-tech gadgetry.

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