Archives for posts with tag: libraries

This infographic shows the ten most challenged books of 2016. Artwork courtesy of the American Library Association.

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The second annual Love Your Data Week (LYD) is scheduled for February 13 – 17.

LYD week is conducted via social media and is coordinated by research data specialists, mostly working in academic and research libraries or data archives or centers. LYD aims to raise awareness about topics related to research data management, sharing, preservation, reuse, and library-based research data services. Practical tips, resources, and stories to help researchers at any stage in their career use good data practices will be shared.

You can add your institution to the list and see other 2017 participants here. You can find detailed information about each day’s activities/resources here.

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Artwork courtesy of the American Library Association

Banned Books Week, sponsored by the American Library Association, is an important event that is held every year. It raises awareness, and does not let us forget, that censorship is unfortunately alive and well.

Click here to read yearly lists of banned and challenged books (at the bottom of the page). You will be surprised at some of the titles included on the lists.

 

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Photo by Daniella Winkler via Unsplash

Here is a strong contender for the best quote of 2016: “We talk a lot about information and the information age, but really what I think people are looking for is wisdom and knowledge.” -David Pescovitz, co-editor at Boing Boing and research director at the Institute for the Future.

Pescovitz, in a recent Business Insider article written by Chris Weller, offers some futuristic views on how libraries are going to change in 50 years’ time. Read the entire article here.

Highlights:

Libraries “are poised to become all-in-one spaces for learning, consuming, sharing, creating, and experiencing — to the extent that enormous banks of data will allow people to ‘check out’ brand-new realities [experiences], whether that’s scaling Mt. Everest or living out an afternoon as a dog.”

“What probably won’t change that much are librarians and the physical spaces they watch over…humans will always need some sort of guide to make a foreign landscape more familiar. Whether humanity turns that job into one for artificial intelligence is another matter.”

Summer

Photo by Todd DeSantis via Unsplash

What business titles are popular with readers this summer? A glance at various published lists lets us know what is hot this summer.

The New York Times Monthly Business Best Seller List – July 2016

Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance, by Angela Duckworth

Shoe Dog: A Memoir by the Creator of Nike, by Phil Knight

Outliers: The Story of Success, by Malcolm Gladwell

The Power of Habit: Wht We Do What We Do In Life and Business, by Charles Duhigg

Self-Made: Becoming Empowered, Self-Reliant, and Rich in Every Way, by Nely Galan

The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future, by Kevin Kelly

The Rise and Fall of Nations: Forces of Change in the Post-Crisis World, by Ruchir Sjarma

Thinking, Fast and Slow, by Daniel Kahneman

Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World, by Adam Grant

The Code of the Extraordinary Mind 10 Unconventional Laws to Redefine Your Life and Succeed On Your Own Terms, by Vishen Lakhiani

The Wall Street Journal Hardcover Business – Best-Selling Books, Week Ended July 3, With data from Nielsen BookScan

StrengthsFinder 2.0, by Tom Rath

Emotional Intelligence 2.0, by Travis Bradberry and Jean Greaves

The Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Leadership Fable, by Patrick M. Lencioni

Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World, by Adam Grant

The Energy Bus: 10 Rules to Fuel Your Life, Work, and Team with Positive Energy, by Jon Gordon

Total Money Makeover: A Proven Plan for Financial Fitness, by Dave Ramsey

Ego is the Enemy, by Ryan Holiday

The One Thing: The Surprisingly Simple Truth Behind Extraordinary Results, by Gary Keller

Living Forword A Proven Plan to Stop Drifting and Get the Life You Want, by Michael Hyatt and Daniel Harkavy

The Ideal Team Player: How to Recognize and Cultivate The Three Essential Virtues, by Patrick M. Lencioni

Smarter Faster Better: The Secrets of Being Productive in Life and Business, by Charles Duhigg is the most borrowed and requested (placed on hold) business related book at public libraries throughout the United States, according to Library Journal, June 2016.

Business Insider has selected their “favorite business memoirs, career guides, and the most exciting research on the future of work,” to read on vacation. The first ten listed are:

Sprint: How to Solve Big Problems and Test New Ideas in Just Five Days, by Jake Knapp, John Zeratsky, and Braden Kowitz

Shoe Dog: A Memoir by the Creator of Nike, by Phil Knight

Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World, by Adam Grant

O Great One!: A Little Story About the Awesome Power of Recognition, by David Novak and Christina Bourg

How to Have a Good Day, by Caroline Webb

Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance, by Angela Duckworth

An Everyone Culture: Becoming a Deliberately Developmental Organization, by Robert Kegan and Lisa Laskow Lahey

Quench Your Own Thirst: Business Lessons Learned Over a Beer or Two, by Jim Koch

Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success In a Distracted World, by Cal Newport

Ego Is the Enemy, by Ryan Holiday

 

 

 

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Photo by Adam Przewoski, via Unsplash

Mindshift’s Ki Sung reports on an interesting partnership between librarians at the Chicago Public Library (CPL) and Peer 2 Peer University (P2PU), which is an online education nonprofit organization. The article starts out with the statistic that about five percent of those enrolled in massive online courses (MOOCs) actually complete the course. Perhaps if online students had access to more support from others also taking the course, there will be greater success with completion rates.

Enter an innovative partnership that offers a Learning Circles program which, with the help of a facilitator, brings together people taking an online course for six to eight weeks. “Learning Circles add a social element to what is otherwise a solitary learning experience.”

As stated in the article, libraries are a perfect fit for Learning Circles because:

  • they already serve the local community
  • they are equipped with meeting spaces
  • many have computer stations
  • librarians know how to help people find answers

In the partnership, librarians, in their facilitator roles, promote discussion and help learners use research tools.

How can something so great not produce positive outcomes? These were mentioned (directly quoted) in the article:

  • CPL’s outreach efforts helped a new population of learners take advantage of MOOCs — 90 percent of those who attended a Learning Circle heard about it through the library and 65 percent of those had never taken an online course before
  • Retention rates were around 45 – 55 percent… [and] students were more compelled to take online courses on their own after the guided experience and continued to do work outside of the learning circles
  • Learning Circles also helped librarians interact with patrons in new ways. They found themselves forming friendships and building community through repeated interactions

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The universal mission of public libraries is to serve and meet the cultural and information needs of their local communities. The business community, without doubt, is an important sector and services are offered with the goal to help local businesses thrive. Unfortunately, many businesses do not know about all the wonderful resources that are available. Here is a list and reasons why businesses, both large and small, should be utilizing the offerings provided by public libraries. It is not necessary to physically visit the library, as most resources are available in 24/7 accessible digital formats.

Business Research Databases

Accessing quality business research data can be expensive and many times the high cost of business databases limits the purchasing of these types of resources. Most public libraries have at least one or two databases that provide company and industry information and access to key business and trade publications. Larger libraries provide access to many of the databases widely used in corporations. Databases that provide the ability to create targeted company lists for sales and supplier identification are commonly available.

Business Publications

It’s true that your business probably subscribes to the key trade publications that are important in the industry in which you practice. What to do when you want to read more than just a select few? The library has access to many key business journals, in addition to local and regional business newspapers (which are important for searching small, private companies). For general business, Zinio is a service that provides access to magazines online and there a Business/Finance genre where publications can be viewed/downloaded.

Business Books

The business book collection in your local library will contain titles that are hot off the press, popular titles, and classics. Business books can be expensive to purchase, which might limit the enthusiasm to read and keep current. Many books can be downloaded on a device of choice from Overdrive or Hoopla and enjoyed while you are commuting to work or jogging around the block.

Books, Music, and Movies for Enjoyment or Relaxation

Download or check out the latest best sellers, songs, or movies. Enjoying fiction and non-fiction books either by reading or listening to them lets you get far away from the stresses of work. Libraries have unique and excellent DVD collections that include hard-to-find foreign films and documentaries.

Access to Search Experts

Many librarians take on subject expert roles, and there is a good chance that one of your local librarians has expertise in business research. Tap into that knowledge to learn the best resources to use for your information need and how to perform research that gets results. Research and digging up information is what reference librarians truly love to do and the harder the challenge, the better!

Free Meeting Spaces

If you are a solopreneur and don’t want to meet clients at your home office (and want a break from the usual coffee shop) the library has small meeting rooms available for free.

Interlibrary Loan Service

Let the librarians find that obscure or hard-to-get article, report, or book. If your local library does not have what you need, the librarians can make a loan request to a lending library, anywhere in the country.

Free Wi-Fi and Computer Use

Many professionals do not work in an office and often work with a laptop anywhere there is a Wi-Fi connection. Also, computers are available for use, along with printers and scanners. As a minimum, expect most to have all the Office applications available.