Archives for posts with tag: motivation

This infographic from MainPath shows how the brain processes different types of content such as written, graphic, interactive, and video. “The way the brain processes different types of content affects a viewer’s emotions and impressions.”

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There is an exciting new crop of business and leadership books coming in 2017 and here are anticipated titles from various published lists:

From Inc.com
Valley of the Gods: A Silicon Valley Story, by Alexandra Wolfe, Jan. 10
Own ItThe Power of Women at Work, by Sallie Krawcheck, Jan. 17
The Net and the Butterfly: The Art and Practice of Breakthrough Thinking, by Olivia Fox Cabane and Judah Pollack, Feb. 17
Stealing Fire: How Silicon Valley, the Navy SEALs, and Maverick Scientists Are Revolutionizing the Way We Live and Work, by Steven Kotler and Jamie Wheal, Feb. 21
The Great Question of Tomorrow: The Ideas that Will Remake the World (TED Books), by David Rothkopf, Apr. 18
American Kingpin: The Epic Hunt for the Criminal Mastermind Behind the Silk Road, by Nick Bilton, May 2
Psyched Up: How the Moments Before Any Challenge Determine Your Success, by Daniel McGinn, June 6
Many Teams, One Mission: A Blueprint for Building Your Team of Teams, by Chris Fussell and Charles Goodyear, July 11
The Power of Onlyness: How to Make Your Ideas Mighty Enough to Dent the World, by Nilofer Merchant, Aug. 29
Untitled Autobiography, by Ralph Lauren, Sept. 10

From TIME
Hit Refresh, by Satya Nadella (Microsoft CEO), fall 2017

From Signature Reads
Irresistible: The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked, by Adam Alter, Mar. 7

From The Washington Post
Mastering Civility: A Manifesto for the Workplace, by Christine Porath, Dec. 27
Own It: The Power of Women at Work, by Sallie Krawcheck, Jan. 17
Stretch: Unlock the Power of Less -and Achieve More Than You Ever Imagined, by Scott Sonenshein, Feb. 7
Madame President: The Extraordinary Journey of Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, by Helene Cooper, Mar. 7
Eyes Wide Open: Overcoming Obstacles and Recognizing Opportunities in a World That Can’t See Clearly, by Isaac Lidsky, Mar. 14
Radical Candor: Be a Kick-Ass Boss Without Losing Your Humanity, by Kim Scott, Mar. 14
Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience and Finding Joy, by Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant, Apr. 24
The Captain Class: The Driving Force Behind the World’s Greatest Teams, by Sam Walker, May 16
The Push: A Climber’s Journey of Endurance, Risk, and Going Beyond Limits, by Tommy Caldwell, May 16
Gorbachev: His Life and Times, by William Taubman, Sept. 7

From Publisher’s Weekly
The Airbnb Story: How Three Ordinary Guys Disrupted an Industry, Made Billions… and Created Plenty of Controversy, by Leigh Gallagher, Feb. 14
The CEO Pay Machine: How It Trashes America and How to Stop It, by Steven Clifford, May 16
Down and Out in the New Economy: How People Find (or Don’t Find) Work Today, by Ilana Gershon, Apr. 10
Making It: Why Manufacturing Still Matters, by Louis Uchitelle, May 2
Wild Ride: Inside Uber’s Quest for World Domination, by Adam Lashinsky, May 23

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Photo by Thomas Litangen via Unsplash

Virginia Woolf’s classic essay, A Room of One’s Own, was written in 1929 and explores, in regards to woman and fiction, the opinion that a woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction. A woman at that time, due to social restrictions, had limited resources, space, privacy and time, all of which are needed to create and write fiction.

Fast-forward to today and a variation on the theme of independence can be explored that pertains to both men and women and includes the world of business. It is about creating an environment that allows for intellectual freedom. One way for business professionals and others who wish to grow creatively and intellectually outside their places of work, is to start businesses of their own.

Starting a business today is vastly different than starting one in the past. The main reason for this is due to, thanks to technology and innovation, the development of open access resources and tools. Starting and running a business in the past required a great deal of investment. Now, the availability of open access resources offer not only high quality, but economical options and opportunities as well.

Here are just a few examples of open access resources and tools and their uses. There are many, many more available:

  • Marketing/Social Media – LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest
  • Social Media Monitoring – Social Mention, Icerocket, Hootsuite
  • Marketing/Communications – blogging sites such as WordPress and Medium
  • Marketing/Design – Canva allows you to design and create professional presentations, flyers, documents, infographics, and more
  • Business and Market Research – SEC filings, Google Trends, Owler, SimilarWeb, Kompass. Emergence of government data combined with analytics
  • Accounting – GnuCash, Wave
  • Virtual Meetings – JoinMe, Google Hangouts, AnyMeeting

Today, it truly is possible to create a personal environment to freely pursue intellectual endeavors. Lucky for us that we live in a time where high quality open access tools and resources are readily available.

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Image Credit: New Year Eve’s Party Favors, by Shari’s Berries via Flickr Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC by 2.0) license

As the new year approaches, readers will start turning their attention to what they will read in 2016. These posts will give you a heads up on what will be available – and also, worth reading.

10 Must-Read Business Books for 2016, Inc, by Anna Hensel

Nine Leadership Books to Watch for in 2016, The Washington Post, by Jena McGregor

Nine Business Books to Read in 2016, Stanford Graduate School of Business, by Natalie White (these are reading recommendations from alumni entrepreneurs and the books are not necessarily new releases)

15 New Business Books to Look For in 2016, Grasshopper Blog, by Kiera Abbamonte

10 New Leadership Books You Must Read in 2016, Small Business Trends, by Ivana Taylor

3 Books That Can Help You Be Better in 2016, and Beyond, Fortune, by Jonathan Chew

Image Credit: Kate Ter Haar, A book that is shut is but a block. ~Thomas Fuller, via Flickr Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC by 2.0) license

Image Credit: Kate Ter Haar, A book that is shut is but a block. ~Thomas Fuller, via Flickr Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC by 2.0) license

Business Insider’s Drake Baer and Mike Nudelman have complied an interesting list of 50 popular books and summarized each in a one-word sentence. They also recommend the list for great reading. You can read the entire list here. Here are my favorites (directly quoted).

Give and Take, by Adam Grant – Givers – people who try to benefit others in their interactions – are the most successful people, since they create durable, career-enabling relationships.

Man’s Search for Meaning, by Vicktor Frankl – People are motivated more by meaning than by pleasure or even happiness.

Rework, by Jason Fried and David Heinemeier Hansson – A lot of the accepted business wisdom – that workaholics are heroes, that a great resume signals a great candidate, and that you need outside investors – is completely false.

The Black Swan, by Nassim Taleb – People are very good at fooling themselves into thinking they know much more than they do, which makes it easy for big, unusual events to surprise us.

Strengthsfinder 2.0, by Tom Rath – Instead of fixing your shortcomings, develop your strengths.

The 4-Hour Workweek, by Tim Ferriss – Success is a matter of designing the life you want to lead.

Business Adventures, by John Brooks – People have been brilliant and idiotic in business for decades.

Get inspired by reading these quotes from literature complied in an infographic by myprint247! Categories include Love, Past, Happiness, Travel, Knowledge, Being, Writing, Success, Life, and Laughter. Here is a sampling of quotes:

“How little we know of what there is to know.” For Whom the Bell Tolls, Ernest Hemingway

“No thief, however skillful, can rob one of knowledge, and that is why knowledge is the best and safest treasure to acquire.” The Lost Princess of Oz, L. Frank Baum

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness.” The Innocents Abroad, or The New Pilgrims’ Progress, Mark Twain

“If you look for perfection, you’ll never be content.” Anna Karenina, Leo Tolstoy

“I may not gone where I had intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be.” The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul, Douglas Adams

Picked up from Steven’s Lighthouse blog.

Ohio University (Online MBA Program) posted this infographic illustrating the benefits of happy employees. “No matter the size of a business, creating stronger engagement among employees and with their superiors will create a happier, faster growing, and more productive workplace.”

Ohio University Online