Archives for posts with tag: trends

pexels-photo-workerBy Dr. Andrew Chamberlain, Chief Economist, Glassdoor, reports on trends that will shape the job market in 2017. Glassdoor, as stated in the report, “has a unique perspective on the labor market, with access to millions of real-time job listings, salaries and company reviews that helps [them] keep a pulse on what’s happening today in hiring, pay and the broader labor market.” The five trends identified are:

The transformation of HR into “people science” – Thanks to low-cost workforce analytics that provide data “on every stage of the employee life cycle,” companies will use data to make HR more scientific.

Automation will change every job – Even though automation mostly effects routine jobs, white collar jobs are also vulnerable. Ongoing skill building that complements technology is key for job seekers.

Shifting away from flashy benefits packages – “In coming years, we’re likely to see large tech employers re-evaluating their benefits packages, more carefully focusing them on core benefits that offer the biggest bang for the buck in terms of engagement and productivity — rather than splashy headlines about unusual workplace perks.”

Taking action against the gender pay gap – “In 2017 and beyond, we are likely to see more companies taking positive action on the gender pay gap, using HR data to correct problems proactively in their own payrolls.”

Realizing the limits of the “gig economy” – “The fastest growing jobs today are ones that require human creativity, flexibility, judgment, and ‘soft skills’ like personal relationships such as health care professionals, data scientists, sales leaders, strategy consultants, and product managers. Those are exactly the kind of jobs least likely to function well in a ‘gig’ economy platform.”

 

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It comes as no surprise to the average college student that free textbook usage is increasing and will more than likely continue to increase at a speedy clip given the high cost of today’s textbooks.

According to a Rice University news release, more than 1.5 million college students have used a free textbook from OpenStax, the university-based publisher. “The number of students using OpenStax textbooks has more than doubled since January, and OpenStax estimates it will save students $70 million in the 2016-17 academic year…More than 811,000 students are using [OpenStax] books this fall, which is a 106 percent increase over spring 2016, and the books are being used in over 4,500 courses at 2,688 universities, colleges and high schools.”0927_osx-numbers-infocomp-lg-1dp4quz

into the primitive

Photo by Lou Levit via Unsplash

Association of American Publishers (AAP) StatShot Annual survey provides insight into sales and volume data collected for categories that include trade (fiction/non-fiction/religious), K-12 instructional materials, higher education course materials, university presses and professional books. Interesting highlights from the press release include:

The area of largest growth for the trade category was Adult Books. Adult non-fiction books sold the most units and provided the most revenue in the trade category for the second consecutive year. Within the Adult Books category, the fastest growing formats in terms of units sold were downloaded audio (up 45.9%), hardback (up 15.1%) and paperback (up 9.1%).

For trade formats:

Downloaded audio: Revenue for downloaded audio has nearly doubled since 2012. From 2014 to 2015, the growth was substantial: 37.6% in revenue and 41.1% in units.

eBooks: After peaking in 2013 eBook revenue declined in 2014 and again in 2015. Unit sales also declined with eBooks now making up 17.3% of the trade book market.

Paperback books: Paperbacks remain the most popular format in terms of units sold, comprising 40.6% of the market.

Hardback books: Hardback books saw growth in both revenue and units over 2014.

 

The StatShot Annual Executive Report with all corresponding data will be available later this summer. To place an advance order: tjordan@publishers.org.

16_Skills_FutureofWorkImage Source: Tanmay Vora, QAspire Blog, August 31, 2015

I ran across a great article through a post shared on LinkedIn (thank you John Semanik). Entitled, Skills For Future Success in a Disruptive World of Work, author Tanmay Vora starts out with the story of his father retiring as a Library Science professional right before libraries were completely transformed by digital disruption. Questioning what skills will be required in a future world of work that will continuously be disrupted by technology and innovation, Mr. Vora lists the “skills young people should be learning to be prepared for a career in 2020,” which are from a 2012 Elon and Pew study, and included in Janna Q. Anderson’s article: The Future of Work? The Robot Takeover Is Already Here.

My favorites:

  • The ability to concentrate, to focus deeply.
  • The ability to search effectively for information and to be able to discern the quality. and veracity of the information one finds and then communicate these findings well.
  • Synthesizing skills (being able to bring together details from many sources).

Mr. Vora, added a few of his own; which are depicted in his graphic shown above:

  • The ability to learn constantly in a self-directed mode.
  • Social Intelligence and ability to connect with people beyond geographical barriers virtually in a deep/meaningful way and collaborate.
  • Adaptive mindset to evolve the thinking and learning to keep pace with the pace of changes around us.
  • Interdisciplinary thinking
  • Critical thinking

 

Shutterstock pulled data from millions of online searches across the globe to discover “what subjects, what concepts, what colors and patterns are inspiring people of today’s creative-verse.” This infographic shows their findings, along with predictions of what’s to come in 2016.

Shutterstock

 

Coastal Creative’s infographic shows us “the next evolution of design for the upcoming year.”

CC_Design_Trends_2016.jpg

O Palsson, The Library and Learning Center by Zaha Hadid, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Austria, via Flickr, Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC by 2.0) license

O Palsson, The Library and Learning Center by Zaha Hadid, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Austria, via Flickr, Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC by 2.0) license

Futurist Thomas Frey (DaVinci Institute, August 6) writes in an interesting article entitled, “The Future of Libraries: Beginning the Great Transformation”:

We have transitioned from a time where information was scarce and precious to today where information is vast and readily available, and in many cases, free…People who in the past visited libraries to find specific pieces of information are now able to find that information online. The vast majority of people with specific information needs no longer visit libraries.  However, others who read for pleasure as example, still regularly patronize their local library.

The Institute has put together ten trends “that are affecting the development of the next generation library,” and also “give clear insight into the rapidly changing technologies and equally fast changing mindset of library patrons.” Here are the trends (directly quoted). Click here to read more detail about each trend.

Trend #1 – Communication systems are continually changing the way people access information

Trend #2 – All technology ends. All technologies commonly used today will be replaced by something new.

Trend #3 – We haven’t yet reached the ultimate small particle for storage. But soon.

Trend #4 – Search Technology will become increasingly more complicated

Trend #5 – Time compression is changing the lifestyle of library patrons

Trend #6 – Over time we will be transitioning to a verbal society

Trend #7 – The demand for global information is growing exponentially

Trend #8 – The Stage is being set for a new era of Global Systems

Trend #9 – We are transitioning from a product-based economy to an experience based economy

Trend #10 – Libraries will transition from a center of information to a center of culture